History and Government:What are the elements of a good lesson plan?

CHAPTER FIVE

5a vi). Discuss the elements of a good lesson plan.

  • Elements of a lesson plan

A good lesson plan should contain the following elements: administrative details, instructional objectives, time, and content, learning activities, resource material and self-evaluation.

  • Administrative details

These includes the name of the school one is teaching; personal details of the teacher, e.g. one’s name and registration number; the specific class to be taught, the size of the class, the subject, the time the lesson will be taught, topic and sub-topic.

  •  Instructional Objectives

Instructional objectives are also known as: specific objectives, learning objectives, behavioral objectives. These are learning objectives which describe what one can do as a result of having learnt and what an observer can see the learner doing in order that one can judge whether or not learning has been successfully achieved. They also forecast on what the teacher intends the students to do at the end of 40 minutes. A good instructional objective is made up of three aspects: terminal behavior, test conditions and level of performance or indication of a standard of performance.

  • Resource material

This refers to printed and non-printed media, which the teacher intends to use during the lesson, It involves merging of the reference and resource material columns in the schemes of work in to one column in the material lesson plan. It includes among others: books, journals, newspapers, magazines, resource people, buildings, places, real objects, specimen, models, the radio, tape recorder and television.

  • Self-evaluation

This takes place after teaching when the teacher looks at the lesson already delivered in an objective manner. The lesson is assessed by asking oneself these questions: f-

  1. Have I achieved my objective?
  2. Have the learners understood my lesson?

 

  • Learning Activities

Learning activities in a lesson plan are the key to success in all history teaching and learning. Learners’ participation is what educationists call “educational activity” which calls for learner-centered approach to teaching.

  • Content

This column includes the historical information, which the teacher wants to pass to the learner. The teacher should select an adequate amount of facts that would give the student a sound picture or understanding of the event, period or the situation of the lesson.

The content column consists of three main steps of a history lesson: Introduction, Lesson Development and Conclusion

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