ECT 300 EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY: What is Micro (Peer) Teaching? What is its place in the teaching process?

CHAPTER 9

DISTANCE EDUCATION

9b iv). Examine the concept of Micro teaching.

MICRO (PEER) TEACHING

WHAT IS MICRO (PEER)-TEACHING?

  • It is a scaled down version of actual teaching in which the teacher trainee teaches for about 5-8 minutes concentrating on only one skill
  • It involves teaching one’s peer/colleagues
  • It is designed to improve teaching skills
  • The performance of the teacher trainee is noted down by the peers and the supervisor and then reviewed or discussed.
  • Once the various skills have been practiced and mastered in isolation, they are eventually integrated and practiced for a slightly longer time (about 15-20)minutes.

BRIEF HISTORY OF MICRO (PEER)- TEACHING

Microteaching was started by Dwight Allen at Stanford University in 1963 as a way of exposing teacher-trainees to broken down teaching skills one at a time. It has since then been used in teacher training to break-down teaching into practical skills. Over the years with massive enrollments and poor facilities. It has been rendered less efficient in the developing world. The original MT model required TEACH- VIEW—CRITIQUE—RETEACH—OBSERVE—CRITIQUE cycle for each student teacher for each skill.

GENERAL OBJECTIVES OF MICRO (PEER)-TEACHING

Micro (peer)-teaching alms at achieving the following objectives:

  • Preparation of student-teachers for the actual teaching practice
  • Reduction of the complexity of the teaching task by allowing student-teachers to concentrate on the practice of specific lesson preparation and presentation skills.
  • Provision of a means of easing the tension on the student-teachers with less trauma, from the theory of methods to the realism of the practical classroom situation
  • Development of critical observation of what constitutes effective teaching

PROCEDURE FOLLOWED IN MICRO (PEER) TEACHING

  • Identify the relevant skill
  • Expose the trainees to the skill through a lecture/demonstration/video show/ film
  • The trainee selecting a topic from the content area of a subject and preparing a micro lesson of between 5-7 minutes that can be used to demonstrate the chosen skill.
  • The trainee should not attempt to squeeze the content of 40 minutes into 5-8 minutes but should target a small section of the content.
  • The micro lesson should include all the expected details such as administrative details, specific objectives, time a location, content, learning activities, resource materials. I should have the 3 stages namely introduction, lesson development and the conclusion.
  • The skill to be practiced should also be indicated
  • Practicing the skill
  • Evaluating the performance of the teacher trainee

Micro-teaching also provides the bridge between educational theories and classroom teaching in 3 phases are:

1. Acquisition of knowledge

Each skill is discussed and analyzed in a general lecture after which a film is shown. In the film, an experienced teacher demonstrates the use of the skill.

2. Acquisition of skills

Each student-teacher after careful study of the skill prepares a micro-lesson of duration 5-8 minutes, a carbon copy of which should be made for the supervisor at the beginning of each practice session. The members of the peer group play the role of the pupils. As much as possible each learner should get an opportunity to prepare and present each of the skills. It is recommended that if time and facilities allow for the tutor to arrange for a video recording, playback and re-teach session so as to address problem areas.

3.Transfer of skills

After all the skills have been practiced separately, an integrated skill practice of approximately 15 to 20 minutes is introduced which aims at integrating the various skills. the supervisor evaluates the performance of the student-teacher and gives feedback.

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